News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Troy Town school, Rochester  (Read 17198 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

medwayexplorer

  • Guest
Re: Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2012, 14:03:38 »
I went to Troy Town in The Fifties, though it wasn't a secondary school then.
Bottom of King Street it was.
My Brothers went to St Margarets in St Margarets Street which transferred to Troy Town and became St. Peters and St Margarets.
I remember Mrs Bailey, Miss Ring and Beril Bates a deaf teacher who road a Motor Scooter.

I went there too. My Nan, Mrs Cook was a dinner lady there. Because she was deaf, we all thought Miss Bates was magic. If you shouted something behind her back at her she knew exactly what you said. (At that age it was only going to be naughty words).

She helped me swim my first 10 yards.

There is a time capsule under the new school now with a cloth we all inserted graphics along with other bits and pieces. (We were learning about the Bayeux Tapestry at the time).

Life was easy back then. :)

Offline rochester1

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 51
  • Appreciation 18
  • 1936 - 22.03.2017
Re: Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2012, 13:50:00 »
I realise this is an old site but I must tell you that the Headmaster of Troy Town was a Mr Collet, not Collier as suggested. There were various other sadistic souls, chief among them was 'Buller' Lockwood who it was said hung a boy out of the window and that was on the top floor!! Others who spring to mind were Mr Burton who was far too sophisticated for Troy Town, he taught among other things, music and tried to teach us to play the recorder. He said; "anyone who learns to play a tune by the next class can go home early." I learnt the 'Trumpet Voluntary'.
God knows why. More to the point it didn't do me any good as when he asked me to regale the class with a rendering of this 'air' he said I was very good and let me go half an hour early. Next morning all my mates said I was a sniveller and beat me up. I don`t like the Trumpet Voluntary!!

Offline AlanH

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Appreciation 27
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #25 on: December 06, 2010, 07:54:43 »
Nice to know there's so much agreement about Mr Blatchely and no doubt many other teachers we all had. Worst thing is all their best efforts totally failed with me but I mostly enjoyed my school days anyway.
There was always a laugh to be had even if I did end up with a sore backside!
Great memories these.
Alan.

grantidge

  • Guest
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2010, 11:04:27 »
Hi AlanH

Mr Blatchley took our class on a camera club outing to Whipsnade Zoo.  It was a wonderful day and I still have some photos.  One of the highlights was holding a baby python.  Baby?  It was plenty big enough, I thought but just not big enough to make a meal out of me!

Mr Blatchley did live in Chatham Maidstone Road.  Sadly he was taken very ill with a stroke at the start of our last summer term (we all cried at the news, boys and all).  Once he was out of hospital, we marched two by two to his house and serenaded him with the folk songs he had taught us.  Later, when I was at the grammar school, two friends and I walked to his house and told him how we were getting on.  Mrs B who was also a teacher and a lovely lady, provided cups of tea and biscuits.

Jill

Offline Mike S

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 182
  • Appreciation 11
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2010, 10:38:38 »
Yes must be the same one, I remember him as being very shy. One of his pictures on display was done at the rear of the Matalwork/Woodwork block at Warren Wood, and included the School Car Club vehicles. This is where I first learnt to drive in 1959. with teacher Taffy Davies as instructor.

Offline AlanH

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Appreciation 27
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2010, 10:22:46 »
Hello Mike.
Probably the same lad,very shy. He painted one excellent pic named in the "Shadow of sickness (or death)" of Barts Hospital  but someone pointed out the shadows were in the wrong direction. Good pic though. I wonder if John is still around?
Alan.

Offline Mike S

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 182
  • Appreciation 11
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2010, 09:55:50 »
If this John Cook is the same one, which I think it probably is, I was in the same class as him at Warren Wood School. I remember there being one or two of his excellent paintings were on dn show on the wall of the Ground floor School corridor.

Offline AlanH

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 332
  • Appreciation 27
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2010, 08:03:43 »
Hi Jill.
I knew Mr Blatchely and agree he was great teacher. He invited me and a friend of mine John Cook (good artist who lived in May Rd) to Oxford on a coach trip with the camera club he belonged to.
John couldn't come for some reason so my elder bro came instead and sometime afterwards as he was interested in photography, Mr Blatchely showed him his darkroom and how to develop photos.
I think he lived on Chatham Maidstone Rd.
Alan.

grantidge

  • Guest
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2010, 17:06:27 »
I went to Troy Town Juniors and got a good education there.  However, I felt the school was only interested in the A stream and to a lesser extent, the B stream kids.  All the rest, which comprised mainly the poor kids from Troy Town itself, got a raw deal; warehoused and scapegoated and given the most ineffective teachers.  I felt the Indian kids got a raw deal too.  

The headmistress was a fearsome old bat called Hilda Ring.  I hated her, although she was fine with me as I was well-behaved, well turned out and an A streamer.  But I saw the way she maltreated other kids and even at that age, knew it was totally wrong.  I also remember Mr Richards  and the best teacher of all, Mr Eric William Blatchley who was the deputy head and taught me in my last year at the school.  A real Mr Chips, and such a good teacher.  Miss J Beryl Bates was a teacher who was deaf and given to wearing rainbow-coloured socks and riding a motor scooter.  She was my guide captain, and was totally bonkers!  I liked her, though.  

The building had been "condemned" some time before I started there but remained in use for some time afterwards.  My friend Tony Joyce was the headmaster at one point.  And the toilets..........UGH!  They stank all year round and froze up in the winter.

Jill

Offline seb

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 75
  • Appreciation 3
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2010, 11:11:30 »
My husband went to Troy Town infants then to St Peters Juniors then back to Troy Town Seniors till it closed and then to Warren Wood.   Warren Wood did not do boxing as it was too dangerous!
He got inspired to box from the barefist fist fights they had on the Jacksons when the circus came.

Offline seb

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 75
  • Appreciation 3
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2010, 17:42:51 »
My husband used to go to Troy Town school where he learnt how to box.  This is the only thing he remembers (or so he says.)

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2010, 21:48:14 »
Thanks Lyn.

Some more before we go back to Troy Town:
Why is it that:
When lights are out they can't be seen, but when stars are out they can be seen.
A fast horse runs, but fast colours don't.
A building goes up in flames while it is burning down?

Next time you meet somebody who is a bit too smug, remind them that a clear conscience is a symptom of a poor memory.

Here is a picture of Troy Town School:
                    
It had two playgrounds: one next to the school where there is what looks like hutted classrooms (it was about half covered by a brick built extension that seems to have been reduced to some sort of white awning), and one in Dunnings Lane, next to the Man of Kent pub.
It seems to have two different styles of architecture and I wonder if it was built in two parts, although it was much bigger the other way, as in this photo:
                      

Does anyone know when it was built?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Merv

  • Guest
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2010, 22:26:49 »
Just seen the picture of the old school, though I remember it before the Portacabins.
The Caretaker lived in the first house up from the school in King Street.

Merv

  • Guest
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2010, 23:55:23 »
I went to Troy Town in The Fifties, though it wasn't a secondary school then.
Bottom of King Street it was.
My Brothers went to St. Margarets in St. Margarets Street which transferred to Troy Town and became St Peters and St Margarets.
I remember Mrs Bailey, Miss Ring and Beril Bates a deaf teacher who road a Motor Scooter.

Offline Lyn L

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1127
  • Appreciation 84
Troy Town school, Rochester
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2010, 11:24:36 »
Hi Alan H,
Spoke to hubby, he said you were right, it was Pongo Palmer, when they won the pools they moved up to City Way, all those years just addled his brain a bit more  :) He can't remember the others ,  Bob Latimer was short with fair hair !!  Still bumps into one or two that were there at the same time.

Lyn
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines